In the kitchen – another text-heavy post

Recently, I covered changes I have made and plan to make in my bathroom.

Today, it’s the kitchen’s turn. I’m not going to cover grocery purchases (having touched upon that here) but I will make mentionof foraging and home-grown produce.

So far, here are the changes I’ve managed to make:
– We’ve reduced the amount of washing-up liquid we use by putting it in a handpump by the sink, instead of leaving it in its bottle.
– I’ve knitted cotton dish-cloths to avoid disposable ones. These can be bleached and washed at 90C should I feel that the regular wash isn’t getting them clean enough.
– We use a recycled dish-brush with exchangable heads (not perfect, but more on that later).
– I’ve replaced kitchen roll/paper napkins with washable ones. These are made from old tea-towels.
– I clean with citrus vinegar and knitted cloths.
– Rather than buy specific storage tubs, I’ve been reusing jars and plastic tubs from the food we’ve been unable to buy package free.
– We dry many of our own herbs/teas.
– We forage as many mushrooms as we can get our mits on!
– We use dishwasher powder instead of tablets – this is available package-free from the local refillery and as we’re in a soft-water area, we can get away with using far less than the recommended amount.
– We use washing powder from a cardboard box (at the moment it’s ASDA’s own brand non-bio) but in future I’ll be trying this from the local refillery.
– We use loose-leaf tea and coffee-beans, rather than bags and pods.
– We have a small one-litre kettle so that we seldom boil too much water.

Once again, pretty good so far. But where could we improve?

To begin with, there’s the scrubbing brush – still plastic, though recycled plastic, and with heads that switch out.

We had tried the lovely wooden brushes which everyone on Pinterest seems to have, but just couldn’t get on with them. Both Husband and I felt like we were bending the neck every time we applied any pressure, but for those of you who are slightly less heavy-handed, they make a really lovely plastic-free alternative.

With both brushes, we tried to extend the lives of the heads by putting them through the dishwasher on the top shelf – a successful endeavour in both cases, though we did get better results with the plastic brush.

So what else still happens in our kitchen which shouldn’t?

We do still boil too much water, despite the mini kettle. I went through a phase of keeping a large Thermos on the side to put surplus boiled water in, but I forgot to use it afterwards. Also, during the winter months, we use a log-burner to heat the living-room and if I actually pulled myself together and bought a hob-top kettle, I could very easily just plop the kettle on the stove and make a cuppa without using electricity at all.

I still use baking paper – especially when making bread in the slow cooker. I’ve tried all sorts of other things to stop the dough from sticking but nothing else has worked. That said, I do reuse the sheets until they grow brittle so it’s still not a single-use item for me. I’d like to invest in some proper reusable ones, but at the moment, it’s not a top priority.

I’ll talk about the raised vegetable beds which husband has made in another post, but for now, let me simply say that they need filling with earth. In the next couple of weeks, I’m going to find a container to put compostable matter in. I do already use a compost bin (when I remember) but to be honest, most of our food-waste goes in the kitchen-caddy to be removed by the local council. Which is fine – don’t get me wrong – but it seems ludicrous sending things away to rot when I need rotted matter here… And again, I know I can’t fill all four beds with kitchen waste (though I reckon I could fill one with spent tea-leafs alone…) but coupled with some manure from the farm at the top of the hill and the bits of tree we need to take down, I imagine we can vastly reduce the amount of soil we need to bring in.

This brings me neatly on to what I feel is the biggest point of waste in my kitchen – the spent tea and coffee. Husband grinds his own coffee beans and uses a filter, which is great, and I’ve been a leaf-tea person since I started drinking tea so at least there’s no plastic there, but there are a lot of leavings. I think I’ve figured out a way to turn some of the coffee grounds into soap as a sort of exfoliator, but the tea has me stumped. I know it will all rot down, but I’m very keen to explore any alternatives – I seem to get through so much daily.

I’ve mentioned my ‘Adventure Kit’ in other posts but I feel it’s worth popping in here too, as reusable cutlery and enamel plates are so incredibly useful. The plates in particular are the stars of my kitchen – they can go straight from freezer to oven (and frequently do when I freeze a crumble), they’re dishwasher safe and are perfect for camping, eating picnics and basically everything.

Is there anything I’ve failed to mention here? Is there something I’ve missed? I’d love to hear other ways I can make a difference in my kitchen.

 

 

 

3 Replies to “In the kitchen – another text-heavy post”

  1. It’s really encouraging to read about the changes you’ve made, I find it’s so easy to feel frustrated about not doing enough or doing it quickly but there are some great ideas in your post – and I’m reassured that it’s not just me who isn’t totally convinced by wooden dish brushes! I made a set of drawstring bags from cotton fabric left over from curtain making, we use them for all sorts of food storage (great for bread in the freezer), it’s certainly reduced the number of freezer bags we use. If you’re growing veggies, a compost heap is a must and both coffee grounds and tea leaves are perfect additions to it; tea leaves can also be sprinkled on soil around plants (garden and house) as a nutrient-rich feed and it’s said that rings of coffee grounds around young plants can help to deter slugs and snails although I’ve had limited success with that one! Tea leaves are also good cleaning / deodorizing material, great for scrubbing into chopping boards to remove food smells.

    Liked by 1 person

      1. I hope you love it, there is nothing quite like growing your own fruit and veg! Don’t believe everything you read about it, either; we break far more gardening ‘rules’ than is healthy but still end up with more produce than we know what to do for it. Feed your soil and have fun! I shall look forward to seeing how you get on. 🙂

        Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s