Your local library.

In 2019, I borrowed and returned 146 books from my local library.

Some of these were reference books, some audio books, some travel guides, and most were fiction.

Normally I buy books used, but even if the average second hand book only cost £1, that’s still £146 saved in 12 months.

If I factor my children into the equation, the financial saving roughly triples.

That’s a saving of £438, give or take a few pounds.

Definitely not a saving to be sniffed at. Admittedly, we are a family of avid readers anyway,  but the amount I read definitely took a sharp incline when I deleted my Facebook account, and when I signed up for the Do Nation ‘feed your noodle’ pledge.

Reading is an amazing, low impact hobby, and one of my great joys in life so it’s easy for me to prioritise it. That said, I understand that this isn’t the case for everyone – libraries everywhere are increasingly under pressure to cut costs, so opening times might be erratic. Ours, for example,  only opens for three days a week and the hours aren’t exactly ideal for shift work. I’m lucky in that I can pop in on my way to school pick up,  but this isn’t the case for everyone.

So, how can we utilise this resource if we’re short on time? Most libraries offer an e-book service which can be accessed at home at any time.  If you don’t have a dedicated e-reader, there are loads of apps out there which allow you to use your phone or computer. This is great for cook books,  or other reference books,  but it’s not necessarily great for reading novels just before bed. This is where Freecycle, Gumtree and eBay come in – both my brother and I have sourced free e-readers from these sites and in our area,  they seem to come up relatively frequently.

There are so many amazing environmental books available at this time – to me,  it just seems right to borrow them from the library so that we can better share resources.

Do you know of any other easily accessible resource sharing schemes out there?  I already rent my video games,  but I’m keen to see what else is out there!

Crafting Gifts in #NothingNewNovember – The map!

I had been planning to buy my dad some woollen socks for his Christmas gift, or to knit a pair. This being #NothingNewNovember, though, I’m unable to just buy the socks, or even the yarn to make them with. Whilst my stash holds plenty of scraps for a few child-sized pairs, there aren’t any leftovers big enough for adult feet and he’s really not an odd-sock sort of human.

So, back to the drawing board.

One of his great passions in life is ‘maps’. He collects a certain vintage Ordnance Survey collection, and I did consider keeping an eye out for some of those missing from his collection – they’re not new, after all! The issue with this is that I don’t know which he has and which he doesn’t. That being the case, I consulted the all-knowing entity that is Pinterest.

And found some absolutely amazing map embroidery – the crafter had consulted (I presume) the satellite photos available online, and from them,  stitched a beautiful, textured landscape.

I’m not an embroiderer, but as I’d inherited a huge stash of sewing silks I decided to give this a try. It’s also going to help towards my Do Nation ‘All Made Up’ pledge…

First, I turned my laptop brightness up to its highest setting and traced the features of the landscape round my parents’ house onto some paper.

I then took this sheet over to my kids’ light box and used it to trace the image onto a scrap of tablecloth (the rest of which I’d used as quilt backing, last year).

I then slipped the cloth into an ambroidery hoop, inherited from my mother-in-law and proceeded to sew!

I haven’t really done any embroidery since I stitched the trails of the planets on a solar-system sampler in my school years (during which, Pluto was still very much a proud planet!), but I remembered chain stitch so started there…

Finally, I started adding in some colour – French knots for the trees and satin stitch for some of the fields…

Then I stopped.

Don’t get me wront – I’m delighted with how it’s looking so far, but I have some travelling to do next week. And frustratingly, I’m going to have to fly.

Aside from the obvious ‘air travel produces SO much waste’ thing, I’m frustrated by my mode of transport for two reasons:
1. I don’t trust that I’ll be able to take my knitting with me, given that my needles are metallic and very pointy.
2. I am terrified of flying.

So, I’m going to take my embroidery along instead, hoping it will have some sort of magical hypnotic power to take my mind of the impending doom that I fear will befall me whilst locked in a metal box, miles above the earth…

Ahem. I digress.

You’ll have to wait until I get home to see the finished article – I’m really excited to see how it turns out and I hope that it’s given you some ideas for tricky gift recipients. ❤

Are you making any of your gifts this year?

#NothingNewNovember

In a recent exploration of Twitter, I stumbled upon the hashtag #NothingNewNovember. And yes, it’s an old one, but one I’m going to attempt it this year regardless.

The reason this appeals so much to me is the timing – it comes at a point in the year when I would normally be getting ready for Christmas. And yes, I already buy a large number of my gifts used – particularly for my own children – but this is a great way to focus my mind in the run up to what is arguably the most wasteful time of year.

I’ll be doing another Do Nation pledge to help me along with this too – All Made Up, in which those participating promise to make a certain number of gifts themselves. As a crafter – I knit well, crochet adequately, and mash things through a sewing machine – I’ve got loads of resources with which to create amazing gifts so I probably need to purchase very little to make this Christmas happen (though many people will be getting knitted socks…).

In addition to only buying used items to gift, or making gifts myself, I intend to buy nothing at all for  my household during this time – beyond the obvious consumables (i.e. food, soaps, petrol etc.)

This will be especially difficult given the fact that I’m going to visit friends midway through the month.

What are your top tips for reducing the amount you buy over the holiday season? Come and let me know!

Mending the Oven – a Do Nation Pledge

Over the past few months, I’ve spoken about fixing my sunglasses, mending son’s trousers, and replacing the lid on daughter’s water bottle as part of Do Nation’s ‘Fix It’ Pledge.

I’d promised to mend four things during the two-month time-frame and as it draws to a close, Husband and I finally got around to doing the big fix which had inspired me to take the pledge in the first place – we mended our oven!

This is the oven which came with the house when we moved in:

Buy RANGEMASTER Classic 90 Dual Fuel Range Cooker - Cream ...

It is, by far, the nicest oven I’ve had access to since I lived at home with Mum’s coal-fired Aga. However…

The long, thin oven on the right hasn’t ever worked. The fan’s been broken since – I presume – before we moved in… five years ago.

To mend this, we searched online for the model number of the oven and found the manual, then from there, we searched for the broken part and bought a replacement. At this point, I would definitely say that you need to be careful with the listings – we searched ‘genuine Rangemaster part’, but if we had read the description better, we would have learned that we were actually buying a part for a genuine Rangemaster…

And usually, I’m all for a bargain, but in this case we got what we paid for. When we opened the package, the bolts we needed to fix the fan in place weren’t there.

We did, however, get three completely superfluous screws…

Luckily the bolts on the original fan were intact so we were able to reuse them, but honestly – they’re grimy and very worn so I’m not entirely comfortable with that. Next time I’m in town, I’ll buy new ones, but for a quick fix this is perfectly adequate.

The swap itself was easy enough and facilitated by a video online (which I won’t post a link to because a. Husband looked it up, and b. your oven is probably different to mine).

The research time for the part was probably ten minutes. Including the cleaning of the space behind the over before we dared tread there, the fitting itself took around thirty minutes. The part cost under £35 including delivery.

So ,I’ll take that as a win!

I’ve now commpleted my four Do Nation repairs, but this has definitely made me rethink a few things. As I said when I posted about Son’s trousers, I’m pretty good at repairing textiles and do so regularly, but it was really nice to learn that it’s not so hard to repair other things too – even bigger, scary, grown-up things like ovens.

Mending Son’s Trousers – a Do Nation pledge

Some of you might remember my earlier posts about repairing Daughter’s water bottle and my old sunglasses.

At the beginning of the pledge,  I promised to mend four items – which,  if you think about the amount of things in the average house,  really isn’t a lot.

As with the water bottle,  I nearly didn’t report this one.  I fix clothes fairly constantly, but then I thought the method might be of use to someone.

So,  two holes in a pair of hand-me-down 100% cotton joggers – one on each knee. For the first,  I sewed up the hole and stitched a patch over the top.  Interestingly,  the patch came from a pair of Daughter’s shoes – there is a loop on the back for the laces. We took them off to make them more suitable for school but put them aside for just this sort of thing.

For the next hole, I didn’t want to use a patch as the tear was tiny.

To start with, I secured the hole…

This is technically a fix in itself and if your child/you is happy with the hole like this,  you should definitely leave it – less work! Unfortunately,  my child wasn’t happy with this so to create a patch, I began weaving over the top with some cotton yarn I had left over from a project.  I chose cotton so that the added fibres could be washed at the same temperature without the risk of uneven shrinkage – something I can’t sew my way out of.

I’m really pleased with the finished trousers – the structural integrity is restored and Son is happy with how they look. I would call that a win.

 

 

Mending Daughter’s Waterbottle – a Do Nation Pledge

I wrote recently about fixing my sunglasses as part of Do Nation’s Fix It Pledge.

Specifically, I said I planned to mend a minimum of four things. Whilst I haven’t managed to get round to mending my quilt or oven yet, I’m already halfway there after tackling my shades and now, Daughter’s water-bottle.

We bought this SIGG flask for my now-eight-year-old when she hit the six-month mark. As a life-long chewer, the sports cap of the bottle had seen better days. I was all ready to shell out on a Klean Kanteen for her when she pointed out that if you could get replacement parts for other branded bottles, you might be able to get one for hers.

So, we did a quick search and I was really impressed by SIGG’s website and the available spares. Whilst the cap itself was far beyond the point of unhygeinic, the lid was totally fine and it was so heartening to see that you could purchase both parts seperately, allowing me to reuse the lid we already had.

The ‘repair’ was so easy that I nearly didn’t write about it. I simply screwed the old cap off, clicked the lid away, clicked it onto the new cap and then screwed that on… job done!

The bottle is now good for another seven years! Inevitably, she’s going to grow out of the beautiful animal pattern by then, but I’m not above a flask with zebras on so when that time comes, we can do a swap.

My singular complaint here is the cost of the postage. The cap was an affordable £3.49, but I didn’t get the option to select second class delivery when I ordered – something which would have made the total cost lower.

Still, two repairs down and only two to go – I wonder how many I can overshoot by, before the end of my pledge!

Have you taken part in a Do Nation pledge?

Let’s talk about water…

Last time I posted, I made a list detailing some of the areas of my life in which I saw the biggest need for change.

The first thing I’m going to tackle is relatively easy as it doesn’t require an initial outlay  – I’m going to time my showers. Normally, this is the part where I would try and calculate any financial saving that I was making so that I could add the money to my weekly shopping budget. As loose fruit/veg & bread etc. tend to cost more than packaged, I like to reallocate any money that I save to help cover the additional cost of making ethical choices, but on this occasion there isn’t going to be any financial saving because my water consumption isn’t metered. As with the rest of Scotland, our water is included in our council tax.

Still, Having read 12 Small Acts to Save Our World, I’ve become increasingly aware of the fact that all the water which comes into our home has been treated to be fit for purpose, which in turn means that it’s passed through a treatment plant. The more water I use (or indeed, waste) the more energy that’s required to treat it.

I suppose that on a remote level, I’ll be saving money because my water-heater won’t need to work for as long if I’m not heating as much water, but those sorts of sums are beyond me. So, for now, the food budget remains the same.

Anyway… The ‘control’ shower… by putting a plug in my bath, turning my shower on and starting a timer, I aimed to see just how much water I was using on average.

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My shower took just under 7 minutes (I had to dry myself before I could grab my phone and camera to stop the clock and take a picture, hence the times not matching).

This is how much water was in the bath.

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Please don’t judge the state of the tub/how cloudy the water is… or the shampoo bar residue to the right of the taps… I didn’t clean the place before taking this picture, which I probably should have thought to do, but there you go.

On some level, I did expect to see this sort of amount of water – it’s less than I’d use in a bath, which is what I’ve always been told is great about showers. But it’s also a lot more than I would like. It was around 10cm deep and that’s a lot. I mean, that’s more than I bathed my kids in when they were babies so that was a bit eye-opening.

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This is my tub – still filthy – after a two minute shower. You can’t really tell from the photo but there’s less than half of the water of the previous shower in there (which makes sense, given that I was in there less than half as long…)

If you have the means to do this (i.e. a shower over a bath), I would definitely give it a go. It’s one thing to read about the amount of water you save, but to actually see it for youself really brings it home.

Having looked at the Do Nation Shower Power pledge, it looks like tackling my showers in this way can potentially save 11kg of CO2 in a two month period…

That’s 66kg over a year.  If everyone in my family does the same, that’s 264kg CO2 per year (presuming they shower a similar length of time to me).

Have you tried any of the Do Nation pledges? Why not tell me about it here, or on Twitter?

Mending my sunglasses – A Do Nation pledge

I’ve had my sunglasses for five years now. They were a birthday gift from my (late) inlaws and I adore them. But because I’ve had them for five years, and because from time to time they fall off as I chase children/dog across the park, or because I walk into trees while I’m out mushrooming, or I sit on them as I get into the car, they’re not in the best of shape.

So. Having signed up for Do Nation’s ‘Fix It’ pledge, I decided that my sunglasses should be the first thing I tackle. I used this tutorial and bought some second hand lenses from ebay. In the interests of transparency at this point, I should say that the lenses cost more than a supermarket pair of shades. Even second hand, Ray Ban lenses were an eye-watering £35 but I didn’t want to risk wasting money on knock-offs and having them not fit my frames so I shelled out for the branded ones. Apparently, the seller had these lenses removed from their own frames and replaced with prescription equivalents and on this occasion, it worked out cheaper than buying directly from Ray Ban.

Going forward, since I plan to keep these glasses until I’m unable to repair them any longer, I’ll be setting up a saved search on eBay. That way if any bargainous ones come up, I can (if funds allow at the time), make a purchase. Failing that, I’ll know what the average price will be so I can save up when the current lenses start getting scratched.

I’m also going to make more of an effort to use the case that the glasses came with. The popper broke shortly after I bought them so I haven’t used it in at least four years, but I’m hoping I can either repair it, or swap it for my prescription glasses case – it’s a hard-shell and as I only wear my regular glasses between the bathroom and the bedroom when I’m without my contacts, this seems like it might be a sensible arrangement.

I pledged to fix four things during the length of the Do Nation ‘Fix It’ pledge. I plan on also mending a memory quilt that was made from my kids’ baby clothes, the oven (which came with the house and has never really worked properly) and whichever thing breaks next.

Have you done any of the Do Nation pledges? Which do you think would make the more difference in your life?